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  • Aktion Amazonas

42 mammals spotted and identified through camera traps in the Pando region of the Amazon Rainforest

Thanks to the work of Conservación Amazónica - ACEAA, species considered Vulnerable by the IUCN Red List, such as the South American Tapir and the Northern Tiger Cat, are now accounted for.

A man installing one of ACEAA's photo traps in the Bolivian Amazon.
Camera trap installation by local actors in Monte Sinai community as a training exercise in the Monitoring Tools workshop of ACEAA. // CREDIT: ACEAA

42 species of mammals have been photographed in the Pando region of the Bolivian Amazon forest between 2015 and 2023. Nearly 800 photo traps were installed across the area by members of the Conservación Amazónica (ACEAA) and local volunteers.


The photo traps aimed to capture the activity of medium and large size mammals, referring to those who weigh between 1 and 30 Kg, and to those who exceed 30 Kg.


These cameras were purchased thanks to a donation from the Torben & Alice Frimodt Foundation and contributions to Aktion Amazonas' fundraising campaign ‘Secrets of the Rainforest', among other donors.

A man and a child installing one of the camera traps of ACEAA in the Bolivian Amazon.
Camera trap installation by local actors and ACEAA. // CREDIT: ACEAA

771 cameras were placed in the municipalities of Filadelfia, Porvenir, Puerto Rico, Santa Rosa del Abuna and Ingavi.


The camera traps were installed using single (one camera trap) or double (two camera traps) stations with a distance of 1.5 to 2 km between them, and with an operational period averaging 35 days (from installation to removal).


Each camera trap was installed at a height of 50 to 60 cm above the ground, primarily on straight trees strategically positioned in areas such as salt peter, fruit-bearing branches, creeks, and paths. These locations were chosen for their high likelihood of detecting wildlife.



Photo traps are a non-invasive technique that allows the observation and recording of species with a relatively small effort, and a minimum disturbance to the animals filmed or photographed.


The data collected from the cameras guides our conservation strategies, helping us protect these species and their habitats.

Jaguar captured by one of the photo traps in the Bolivian Amazon Rainforest. // CREDIT: ACEAA
Jaguar captured by one of the photo traps in the Bolivian Amazon Rainforest. // CREDIT: ACEAA

The Jaguar, the Ant Bear, the Puma and the Capybara are some of the other 42 species that were captured by the camera traps in the Bolivian Amazon.

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